THIS MONTH IN COFFEE TALK

SEPTEMBER 2019

¡MÉXICO!

On September 16, Mexico will commemorate her fight for indepenence from Spain, which started 209 years ago, on September 16, 1810. The struggle would last for eleven years, ending on September 27, 1821, with the victorious march into Mexico City by the insurgent army under Agustin Iturbide. That part of New Spain which we know as Mexico had much more territory in 1821 than it does now. It encompassed a vast part of what are now the southwestern states of the United States, including my home state of Texas. We can’t know what might have happened if Spain had been able to keep her American lands, but we can be sure that our own stories would be quite different.

MEXICO IN 1819, TWO YEARS BEFORE WINNING THE WAR FOR INDEPENDENCE


16 de septiembre

Map of Mexico in 1819

Guadalajara, Guadalajara (song)

Guadalajara, Guadalajara (gallery)

My First Year in Mexico

Progenitors of La Raza

English / Spanish Glossary of Edible Plants

Beyond Burritos and Margaritas: Mexican Foods You May Not Have Met Yet

HOME COOKING: Café de Olla


BUSINESSES * SERVICES * EVENTS

Fruit and Stuff

If you’re giving up meat, you’ll find useful information at Fruit and Stuff. If you’re not, so will you!


ELITE PERFORMANCE CHIROPRACTIC, McKINNEY, TEXAS


ZINGARA ARTE EXPERIENCES, PUERTO MORELOS, MEXICO

ZINGARA ARTE ON FACEBOOK


If you want to link your business, service or event under BUSINESSES * SERVICES * EVENTS, send a message through CONTACT. Approved listings will be FREE THROUGH DECEMBER 2019 with no obligation.

Progenitors of La Raza

The conquest and fall of Mesoamerican civilizations, celebrated by some, lamented by many, gave rise to a new race, la raza, the mestizo. The patriarch of this new race is Spaniard Don Hernán Cortés Monroy Pizarro Altamirano. The mother is a Nahua slave, first called Malinalli, later baptized Marina by the Spanish when they received her among a group of twenty female slaves. She had first been given to Alonso Hernández Portocarrero, but when he was called to return to Spain, Hernán Cortés took her as his slave, Nahuátl-Mayan interpreter, and lover. Their son, Martín Cortés, considered one of the first mestizos, was born in 1522. In addition to interpreter and lover, Malinalli eventually became war councilor, diplomat, and spy for Cortés .

Malinalli is known in history as Malintzín, Malinche, or Doña Marina. She was still a child when her life took an unfortunate turn as her father, a cacique of some influence, died, and her mother remarried and soon gave birth to a son. In order to establish that son as ruler, her mother sold Malinalli as a slave, and she eventually came to be owned by a Mayan ruler in the Tabasco region, where she learned the Mayan language. Her native language was Nahuátl. The concession of the twenty slave girls was made when the Spaniards defeated the Tabascans at the Battle of Centla.

Malinalli eventually learned Spanish, but she began her work as Cortés´s interpreter even before she had mastered his language, with the help of a shipwrecked Spaniard, Jeronimo de Aguilar, who had been held in captivity by Mayans and was rescued by Cortés in Cozumel. Malinalli translated from Nahuátl to Mayan, and de Aguilar translated from Mayan to Spanish. There is considerable evidence that Malinalli was much more than a simple translator and concubine for Cortés. The soldier and historian Bernal Diaz del Castillo called her a great woman. Indigenous drawings of the time seldom show Hernán Cortés without Doña Marina by his side, and she is even portrayed alone, directing events without him.

While much appreciated by the Spaniards, she has been maligned as a traitor to her own people, and even today, a person who reveres foreign cultures, goods, and people, is called in derision a “Malinchista.”Whether a hero, a traitor, or simply a victim of circumstances, this Mother of the Mestizo Race was surely a very intelligent woman whose strength and independent spirit were far ahead of her time and circumstances.


(PHOTOS: Malinche, Hernán Cortés Monroy Pizarro Altamirano, Martin Cortes, their son, the first known mestizo.)

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