THIS MONTH IN COFFEE TALK

SEPTEMBER 2019

¡MÉXICO!

On September 16, Mexico will commemorate her fight for indepenence from Spain, which started 209 years ago, on September 16, 1810. The struggle would last for eleven years, ending on September 27, 1821, with the victorious march into Mexico City by the insurgent army under Agustin Iturbide. That part of New Spain which we know as Mexico had much more territory in 1821 than it does now. It encompassed a vast part of what are now the southwestern states of the United States, including my home state of Texas. We can’t know what might have happened if Spain had been able to keep her American lands, but we can be sure that our own stories would be quite different.

MEXICO IN 1819, TWO YEARS BEFORE WINNING THE WAR FOR INDEPENDENCE


16 de septiembre

Map of Mexico in 1819

Guadalajara, Guadalajara (song)

Guadalajara, Guadalajara (gallery)

My First Year in Mexico

Progenitors of La Raza

English / Spanish Glossary of Edible Plants

Beyond Burritos and Margaritas: Mexican Foods You May Not Have Met Yet

HOME COOKING: Café de Olla


BUSINESSES * SERVICES * EVENTS

Fruit and Stuff

If you’re giving up meat, you’ll find useful information at Fruit and Stuff. If you’re not, so will you!


ELITE PERFORMANCE CHIROPRACTIC, McKINNEY, TEXAS


ZINGARA ARTE EXPERIENCES, PUERTO MORELOS, MEXICO

ZINGARA ARTE ON FACEBOOK


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16 de septiembre

(PHOTO: Former President Enrique Peña Nieto concluding El Grito in 2015.)

At 11:00 p.m. on September 15, 2019, President Andrés Manuel López Obrador will emerge from the National Palace to a balcony overlooking the lavishly decorated Zócalo and, for his first Independence Day celebration as President, ring the bell that Father Miguel Hidalgo rang in the town of Dolores during the first hours of September 16, 1810. Mexicans call this commemoration El Grito–The Shout.

Father Hidalgo rang that bell to call together the dissidents, some of them politial prisoners who, with his help, had escaped from prison a few hours earlier. He challenged them to join in the fight for independence from Spain.

After he rings the historic bell, President Lopez Obrador will recite a series of shouts, mentioning by name those first heroes of Mexican independence (“Long live the heroes who gave us our homeland!”) recalling the spirit, if not the exact words, of Hidalgo’s original Cry of Dolores. The crowd gathered in the Zócalo will echo “¡Viva!” after each line.

  • ¡Mexicanos!
  • ¡Vivan los héroes que nos dieron patria!
  • ¡Viva Hidalgo!
  • ¡Viva Morelos!
  • ¡Viva Josefa Ortiz de Domínguez!
  • ¡Viva Allende!
  • ¡Viva Aldama y Matamoros!
  • ¡Viva la Independencia Nacional!
  • ¡Viva México!
  • ¡Viva México!
  • ¡Viva México!

The President will ring the bell once more, wave the flag, and join in singing the National Anthem with the thousands of people down in the plaza. The ceremony will conclude with an impressive fireworks display. The festivities conclude with a military parade the morning of September 16. A similar ritual is carried out by governors and mayors in state capitals and other cities and towns throughout the country.

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